Facebook vs. Real Life

Taking a perfect photo of kids is tough. Rarely do I get a perfect picture that is social media post-worthy unless I try a hundred times. There’s bribing, making silly faces, jumping up and down like a fool trying to get them to laugh- it can be exhausting at times! However, the results can be hilarious. Reality is refreshing, and so much better than those perfect pictures sometimes. I’m very guilty of posting the most precious pictures on social media, but I also love it when someone posts a “real-life”  picture of their kid. I love seeing kids being kids- because they certainly aren’t perfect! And it makes my crazy life seem a little more normal.

Because I never delete pictures, and because I secretly love those “imperfect” pictures the best, here is a refreshing dose of picture taking reality (or Facebook vs Real Life, as I like to call it).

I am NOT happy you made me do this

 

The split second she stopped crying, you can bet I got my Facebook worthy post

 

Not impressed with this daddy-daughter date that’s about to go down

 

Did you say Chickfila? Okay, I’ll give you a half-smile

 

We don’t care if you put us in matching shirts, we’re tired and hungry and aren’t posing for you right now

 

Did you say chicken nuggets? Will a fake smile do?

 

Seriously mom?? Can you at least dress me first before we take this sentimental photo of me looking at my newborn clothes?

 

I’ll only pretend like I care that these clothes are being passed down to my sister if you give me a paci first (filter added for the nostalgic effect of course).

 

I’m hot and I just want to eat the candy that’s in my Easter eggs- so get the phone out of my face please

 

Sometimes we can get her to take a sweet-looking picture with me. She was feeling generous this day- and we had Easter eggs to bribe her with #winning

 

Hey girls- hug and show me how much you love each other!

 

…..a thousand takes later

 

Can we please just GO??

 

After several attempts of two women doing everything we can out of desperation to get 3 kids to smile…not too bad!

 

That’s fine mom- you try and get your selfie in front of the castle at Magic Kingdom, I’ll sit here and pick my nose
Yup, still not feeling the selfie in front of this castle ya’ll

 

We decided on an angle that wouldn’t make it so obvious that she had NO interest in getting this very important picture

And sometimes, no matter how hard you try, that perfect picture just never comes.

It’s my party and I’ll cry if I want to! Plus I’m sick, so if you think you’re going to get a good picture of me on my birthday, you’re crazy.

 

Nope. Not today.

 

We tried so hard to get a good Thanksgiving photo this year…
…apparently we didn’t try hard enough

 

I tried so hard this Memorial Day to get a good picture of Carli and her friends. This picture, taken by a random guy at the parade, turned out to be my favorite. Not because my child is obviously having a meltdown due to the heat and lack of a nap, but because this is something I know I’ll look back on and be able to laugh about. Parenting for real.

And other times, you get the perfect photo without even having to try…

Completely captivated. Thank you Cinderella!

Am I really addicted to sugar?

“I’m addicted to chocolate.” I can’t tell you how many times I have heard this statement during one of my counseling sessions. It’s something that’s easy to joke about, but I have seen those who seriously struggle with cravings for sweets that are so intense they will do anything possible to get their hands on chocolate, ice-cream, cookies…anything to get their fix. Is sugar addiction real? Is it something that can be treated? Or is it just a matter of having good willpower? 

Now that she's discovered sugar, she can smell it from a mile away
Now that she’s discovered sugar, she can smell it from a mile away

There are physiological and environmental factors that influence our drive to eat. This starts with metabolic sensors in our body that are controlled by internal fat stores, blood glucose levels, nerves in our gut and hunger/satiety hormones. Physiologically, food intake is also influenced by the pleasure we get from eating. There is a pleasure-reward circuitry in our brain and when we eat something that is highly palatable (such as a food high in sugar) this causes the release of opiods (“bliss chemicals”- includes endorphins) that make us feel good. Sometimes even the anticipation of food can release these chemicals and give us pleasure! Ever been to a Christmas party and see the arrangements of sweets on the table and feel the need to eat one as soon as possible? Just the external stimuli of highly palatable foods can cause the release of dopamine (another one of those bliss chemicals that when activated can stimulate the pleasure “hot spot” of the brain, which just magnifies the pleasure we feel during activities like eating, sex and nurturing) in such a small amount that it teases us into wanting the full effect. Studies have actually shown that continuous consumption of foods that are high in sugar can stimulate the drive to eat more even when there is no physiological need for food. Overconsumption of these foods can lead to a greater release in dopamine (which results in greater pleasure). There is actually a “dulling” effect of the reward system in our brain when we overeat these highly sugary foods which results in a need for eating even more of these foods to bring dopamine signaling back up to pleasurable levels. This can lead to a vicious cycle that results in the need to eat more and more sweets to get the feeling of gratification, leading to addiction to that particular food (or anything in general that is high in sugar).

Amazingly, sugar addiction is caused by activation of the same regions of the brain that are activated in response to drugs that are highly abused. There is evidence to show that repeated exposure to large amounts of foods high in sugar can alter the brain similar to the way drugs do to promote constant consumption and loss of control. The excess consumption of these foods also downregulate pathways (as mentioned before), so continued intake becomes necessary to relieve stress or seek comfort. It becomes much like drug usage, continued intake is needed to prevent withdrawals.

So what makes a food have addictive qualities? It’s highly processed foods that are made by science (typically accompanied by chemical additives and flavor enhancers) not products of nature (fruits and vegetables, grains that are not processed) that trigger the release of dopamine and opiods into our system, similar to the way that recreational drugs do. Foods especially high in sugar can be highly addictive because of their rapid absorption into the bloodstream, causing a spike in blood sugar resulting in a spike of dopamine, followed by a crash of the two resulting in hunger and the need for more sugar to get that “sugar high” again. High fructose corn syrup (added to sugary items such as soda) can make food even more addictive because fructose is associated with reduced levels of appetite suppressing hormones. Fructose consumption can actually increase food intake by promoting sensations to increase hunger despite metabolic needs. Finally, artificial sweeteners such as splenda can increase our addiction to sugar. Usage of these confuse the brain- it thinks we are getting something sweet but we are really not getting any calories from consuming them. This leads us to being unable to read our internal hunger signals which can disrupt our ability to eat intuitively. The intense sweetness of these sweeteners also increases our sweet threshold which can result in increasing our preference for sweet flavors.

While highly processed and sugary foods have addictive qualities, foods naturally high in sugar do not. I’ve heard so many people say they don’t eat fruit because their diet won’t allow it, it’s too high in sugar, they’re avoiding carbs….the list goes on. Fruit does have fructose but the quantity is substantially less than that found in processed foods. Fruit also raises blood glucose levels, but at a much slower rate than processed foods high in added sugar, which results in a much slower release of dopamine. Fruit also is high in fiber and phytochemicals (health benefiting nutrients), something that highly processed foods with added sugar do not have.

So how can you conquer or prevent sugar addiction? There are stages as outlined by the Food Addiction Institute:

1). Stop getting high on trigger foods- any of these are false fixes that lead to a short-term reward.

2). Choose healthy fixes- These include physical activity, nourishing food choices, and positive interactions. Eating more of these “whole food choices” help to recalibrate brain chemistry. Good choices include lean protein to promote satiety, healthy fats (especially foods high in omega 3 fatty acids) and carbohydrates that are not processed but high in fiber (fruits, vegetables, whole grains and beans). All of these positive fixes can boost dopamine response.

3) Expect withdrawals- Know that it may take 2-5 days for cravings to subside. It’s important to have a good support system during this time

4) Know that your taste buds CAN change- but gradually- it can take 8-12 weeks for recalibration to occur. Be patient and stick with it. Eventually you can train your brain to appreciate and enjoy the taste of healthful foods.


I promise you can love veggies just as much as I do!
I promise you can love veggies just as much as I do!

5) Learn how to deal with emotions and stress in ways other than eating. Exercise, prayer and a strong support group are all good outlets.

6) Make realistic long-term goals to work toward, and set short term goals to get there.

7) Do NOT diet!!!! I cannot stress this enough. Diets don’t work and mess with our ability to eat intuitively. Dieting induces neuroadaptations in the reward circuitries of the brain that were designed to favor survival in times of food scarcity. This can result in behaviors that lead to binging, obsession with food, and the increased desire for highly palatable foods. This is why I always recommend staying away from dieting and focusing on developing a healthy relationship with food and peace with your body.

Welcome!

Hello!

Welcome to my blog! There is so much misinformation about nutrition on the internet and I hope this can be a place for you to find helpful (and truthful) dietary advice. I want to be as authentic as possible, and I hope to do that by sharing some of my own struggles with food and dieting. As a registered dietitian I have completed a 4 year degree program at an accredited university (Purdue University- boiler up!!) followed by a 10 month supervised practice internship program in Corpus Christi, TX. FINALLY in 2011 I was able to sit for the RD exam, which upon passing I became a registered dietitian! The information on this blog is largely influenced on personal experiences in my professional practice and education and may or may not reflect the view of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. I can assure you that any recommendation for disease prevention and medical nutrition therapy is fully supported by evidenced based research.

I struggled with an eating disorder for many years before becoming a dietitian. Even while completing my education at Purdue and during my internship I privately fought the urges to fall back into my disordered eating habits- and I struggled to keep those thoughts quiet. I have fully recovered from my eating disorder and that is something I am proud of. My mission is to use my personal experiences along with my nutrition expertise to help people who struggle with the same issues I did for so long. From my experience, a person does not have to have a clinically defined eating disorder to allow food and eating rituals to control their life. The first four years of my practice I worked primarily with adults who were overweight or obese- many had multiple health issues which stemmed from their weight. Issues that came up so often were their feelings of guilt when eating, failing diets, feelings of hopelessness related to food and weight and the frustration that making the lifestyle change was not possible.

I think that for most people, this is normal. And to an extent, that’s okay. When you wake up in the morning and your jeans fit tighter than they did the week before it is probably going to be a little upsetting. You may feel a little guilty after eating 2 helpings of dessert. The difference is- do you let this dictate how the rest of your day goes? Does the number on the scale determine your self-worth? Do you have a bad day and then give up on yourself? I believe that normal, intuitive eating starts with developing a positive self-image. Once the focus is shifted away from the scale and good foods/bad foods (did I follow my diet perfectly?) then the changes can be made.

I’m here to help with simple meal planning, ideas on how to change your eating habits for LIFELONG change, and to discuss the struggles we all deal with on a daily basis when it comes food.

Can’t wait to connect with you!

 

With love,

Jennie